Thursday, July 21, 2016

The Brexit Effect -What’s next for Markets

Brexit

Britain’s Vote – European Union Likely to Disturb British/European Economies


Mentioning that Brexit vote on June 23 which had taken the financial market unaware could be an understatement and the pound, British stocks as well as the Gilt yields had mounted sharply in the week which lead up to the vote but crashed once the results began coming in.

Generally speaking, strategists on Credit Suisse’s Global Markets and Investment Solutions and Products (IS&P) teams anticipate markets to stay volatile in the forthcoming days and for the investors to favour safe assets to the uncertain ones.

 Some of the views have been highlighted from across the bank on how Britain’s referendum vote leaving the European Union is likely to disturb the British as well as the European economies and a broad range of financial resources.

The Economic Impact


The Credit Suisse’s Global Markets and IS&P team are of the belief that the Brexit vote would be creating a considerable amount of uncertainty for British businesses which would eventually lead to a weakening in GDP. Both the teams also tend to believe that the Bank of England would step in with cuts in rate.

Moreover, the Global Markets team believes that the Bank of England to cut rates from 0.5% to 0.05% and had another round of measurable easing to the tune of £ 75 billion which would not be later than August 2016.

Credit Suisse’s Chief Investment Officer for International Wealth Management, Michael O’Sullivan, pointed out that the central banks all over the work seems to be on alert to step in, ensuring that their own banking systems tend to have sufficient liquidity. Besides weak corporate spending, Global Markets economists anticipate growing inflation as well as the decline of the British pound to squeeze household expenditure.

Accordingly, they predicted that GDP would fall 1% between the third quarter of 2016 and the first quarter of 2016 which would have lessened their growth predictions for 2016 from 1.8% to 1% and the 2017 growth predictions from 2.3% to 1%.

Significant Slowdown in Growth


The analysts of Credit Suisse’ IS&P also expect a significant slowdown in growth and the teams contemplate it possible that the deteriorating value of the pound would be causing a front-page inflation to spike. The Global Markets team also seem to anticipate an impediment to the recent pickup in corporate spending especially in Europe together with the tightening of financial conditions.

The economists of the team had dropped their European GDP growth expectations from 1.7% to 1.5% in 2016 and from 2% to 1% in 2017. Credit Suisse’s IS&P team are of the belief that the Eurozone would not be following the U.K. into depression unless the Brexit vote ends in severe financial infection to peripheral economies like Italy. However, the analysts on the team envisage this as a tail risk. The IS&P team are of the belief that the European

Central Bank would lengthen its quantitative easing program whereas the Global Markets team consider that there is a possibility with added easing through the prevailing TLTRO program offering low-interest funding to commercial banks.Credit Suisse’s Investment Committee has downgraded European stocks to neutral as well as British stocks to drift whereas the U.S. stocks to neutral. Moreover strategists of Credit Suisse’s Global Markets had shifted their year-end goals from 6,600 to 6,200 on the FTSE 100, 2,150 to 2,000 on the S&P 500 and on the Eurostoxx 50, from 3,350 to 2,950.

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